Top 8 Weirdest Tomb Stones

No matter how spooky graveyards may be, people will always have some dark fascination from them, especially if famous people are buried in there. Usually the tombstone is the final quite and a summary of a life, but some people prefer having dramatic and extraordinary grave statues that will be remarkable and eccentric just like their lives. Here are some of the weirdest tomb stones ever.

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#1. David Alleno

The Recoleta Cemetery is most famous for being the final resting place of Eva Duarte de Peron “Evita,” but it actually holds many famous military leaders, presidents, scientists, poets and other important or wealthy Argentineans. David Alleno was an Italian immigrant who dreamed of being buried in the prestigious cemetery where he worked as a caretaker from 1881 to 1910. He saved enough money to buy a space and built his own tomb and even traveled back to his Italy to find an artist who could carve his own figure in marble, complete with keys, broom & watering can. Legend says that after the tomb was finished David took his own life inside his grave, but many reputable sources say he died years after the tomb was constructed.

David Alleno

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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#2. The couple who hated each other

This headstone is also located at the Recoleta Cemetery in Argentina. As you can see on the photo a man sitting on his chair looking seriously at the horizon while a woman is seated in another one, at his back, but they are looking in opposite directions. They are placed like that because he died first, so the family made his Mausoleum. Some years later, when his wife died, in her testament she asked to be placed that way to represent their marriage: they spent their last 30 years without speaking a word.

The couple who hated each other

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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#3. The man who holds his wife’s head

Fernand Arbelot was a musician and actor who died in 1990 and was buried in the Pere Lachaise cemetery. He wished to gaze at the face of his wife for eternity.

The man who holds his wife’s head

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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#4. A jumping boy

The monument shows a boy jumps upward from his wheelchair trying to reach a butterfly. The boy was tied to a wheelchair during his short life, so he is now free of the earthly burdens.

A jumping boy

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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#5. Gravestones around a tree

Gravestones stacked around a tree which has grown up since part of the St. Pancras burial ground was cleared in the 1860’s to make way for the London & Midland railway line. The young architect supervising the work was Thomas Hardy.

Gravestones around a tree

Image Source: www.upload.wikimedia.org

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#6. The tomb of the Belgian writer who tries to escape it

Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris is one the most visited graveyards in the world, and it’s known for the beauty of its monuments as for the celebrity of its occupants. This is probably the most dramatic tomb and belongs to an author most people have never heard of – Georges Rodenbach. He was a 19th century Belgian writer, best known for a book pretty much relegated to serious literary students. Bruges-la-Morte, a symbolic novel published in 1892, was about a man mourning his dead wife. So, it’s painfully poignant that Rodenbach’s tomb depicts a patina bronze statue of himself actually emerging from the grave, with a rose in one hand. This would scare you for life (of course if you see it in the dark).

The tomb of the Belgian writer who tries to escape it

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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#7. Wooden clothespin

Jack Crowell was the man who owned the last wooden clothespin manufacturing factory in the United States. He originally wanted a real spring in the clothespin so that children could play on it (like children would go to the graveyards to play?!).

Wooden clothespin

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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#8. Davis family tomb

This looks a bit crowded and perhaps if you didn’t know we discuss graveyards and tombs, you would think that this is a museum or something like that. The most famous attraction in Hiawatha, Kansas is a 1930’s tomb sitting in Mount Hope Cemetery near the southeast edge of town. John Milburn Davis came to Hiawatha in 1879 at the age of 24. After a short time, he married Sarah Hart, the daughter of his employer. Her family did not approve. The Davises started their own farm, prospered and were married for 50 years. When Sarah died in 1930, the Davises were wealthy. Over the next 7 years, John Davis spent most of that wealth on Sarah’s grave (about $100,000). It was a large amount and included the signing over of the farm and mansion. This was during the Depression, when money was a huge problem. The Davis Memorial grew by stages but if it had been planned, it might have been built on a larger lot and made more attractive. The memorial began with a typical gravestone, but John worked with Horace England, a Hiawatha monument dealer, making the gravesite more and more elaborate. There are 11 life-size statues of John and Sarah Davis made of Italian marble, many stone urns and a marble canopy that is reported as weighing over 50 tons.

Davis family tomb

Image Source: www.oddee.com

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