These most emotional photos made the world cry

One picture speaks one thousand words. And these photos definitely left the world speechless and in tears. Some of the most heartbreaking and sad photos showed the world what it looks like to be in war, natural disasters and riots, to survive and to fight for better life. The photographers who took them for sure deserve all the awards, but in the end of the day the people who made it through those hard times are the real heroes.

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1 War Underfoot (Carolyn Cole)

Los Angeles Times photographer Carolyn Cole took this terrifying photo during her assignment in Liberia. It shows the devastating effects of the Liberian Civil War. Bullet casings cover entirely a street in Monrovia. The Liberian capital was the worst affected region, because it was the scene of heavy fighting between government soldiers and rebel forces.

War Underfoot (Carolyn Cole)

Image Source: www.img.badman.sk

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2 Thailand Massacre (Neil Ulevich)

Neal Ulevich was the photographer who won the 1977 Pulitzer Prize for a “series of photographs of disorder and brutality in the streets of Bangkok, Thailand”. The Thammasat University Massacre took place on October 6, 1976. It was a violent attack on students who were demonstrating against Field Marshall Thanom Kittikachorn who was a dictator who was planning to come back to Thailand. The return of the military dictator from exile provoked very violent protests. Protesters and students were beaten, mutilated, shot, hung and burnt to death.

Thailand Massacre (Neil Ulevich)

Image Source: www.cdn.buzznet.com

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3 Kosovo Refugees (Carol Guzy)

Carol Guzy was the first woman to receive a Pulitzer Prize for spot news photography. She received her most recent Pulitzer in 2000 for her touching photographs of Kosovo refugees.The picture portrays Agim Shala, a two-year-old boy, who is passed through a fence made with barbed wire to his family. Thousands of Kosovo refugees were reunited and camped in Kukes, Albania.

Kosovo Refugees (Carol Guzy)

Image Source: www.iconolo.gy

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4 After the Storm (Patrick Farrell)

Miami Herald photographer Patrick Farrell captured the harrowing images of the victims of Haiti in 2008. Patrick documented the Haitian tragedy with impressive black-and-white stills. On the photography named “After the Storm” is a boy who is trying to save a stroller after the tropical storm Hanna struck Haiti.

After the Storm (Patrick Farrell)

Image Source: www.thephotographer4you.com

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5 World Trade Center 9/11 (Steve Ludlum)

One of the most powerful and caught in the moment photo taken on September 11th 2001 belongs to Steve Ludlum. The consequences of the second aircraft crashing into New York’s WTC were devastating: fireballs erupted and smoke billowed from the skyscrapers anticipating the towers’ collapse and monstrous dust clouds.

World Trade Center 9/11 (Steve Ludlum)

Image Source: www.blog.binadarma.ac.id

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6 Bhopal Gas Tragedy 1984 (Pablo Bartholomew)

This picture belongs to Pablo Bartholomew the Indian photojournalist who captured the Bhopal Gas Tragedy. In India’s worst industrial catastrophe 558,125 people were injured and over 15,000 died. Because safety standards and maintenance procedures had been ignored at the Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) pesticide plant in Bhopal, a leak of methyl isocyanate gas and other chemicals triggered a massive environmental and human disaster.

Photographer Pablo Bartholomew rushed to document the catastrophe. He came across a man who was burying a child. This scene was photographed by both Pablo Bartholomew and Raghu Rai, another renowned Indian photojournalist. “This expression was so moving and so powerful to tell the whole story of the tragedy”, said Raghu Rai.

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Bhopal Gas Tragedy 1984 (Pablo Bartholomew)

Image Source: www.southasiainstitute.harvard.edu

7 After the Tsunami (Arko Datta)

This is one of the representative and heartbreaking photos of the aftermath of the Indian Ocean tsunami. It was taken by Reuters photographer Arko Datta in Tamil Nadu. He won the World Press Photo competition of 2004. The New York Times Magazine characterized Datta’s image as a “graphic, historical and starkly emotional picture.”

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“After the Tsunami” illustrates an Indian woman lying on the sand with her arms outstretched, mourning a dead family member. Her relative was killed by one of the deadliest natural disasters that we have ever seen: the Indian Ocean tsunami.”

After the Tsunami (Arko Datta)

Image Source: www.harianblogger.com

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