An amazing account of a filmmaker who replaced his eyeball with a camera!

Accidents often have a lasting effect on a person’s personality and their perspective towards life. This cannot be truer than in case of Rob Spence, a filmmaker in Toronto. Take a look at this interesting story on how Rob sees the world through the lens of the camera.

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1 Vision for the Future

The filmmaker suffered from a fatal injury when he was 9 years of age. He held a shotgun against the eye when shooting at a pile of cow dung. Years later, the filmmaker had the idea of removing the injured eye and replacing it with a camera.

Rob remembers the surgery and says that everyone was left bewildered with his decision as this was like a science fiction story to most of the people around.

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Vision for the Future

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2 Instant Recognition

It is not as if Rob is running after recognition but the filmmaker would be featuring in a true life series show “Dark Net”, which talks of the scenario where lives of extraordinary people are discussed. The innovation in this case is that the filmmaker is able to conduct interviews without the presence of camera crew as the eye lens does all the work.

Instant Recognition

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3 Ethical Questions

The idea of this eyeball camera has raised many ethical questions, even if it concerns the life of only one person. The questions are similar in intensity as were with Google Glass, which did not get much support due to safety and privacy issues as it was able to record anything and everything that came within sight.

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Rob too had to suffer with similar concerns as people did express their surprise at the device but were anguished equally as it did concern the privacy of other individuals too.

On a lighter note though, Anna Louise Abraham, the wife of Rob is however one person who would not be too happy with this innovation as Rob is able to view her and their dog secretly in the apartment even as Anna is not aware on what Rob would be doing.

Ethical Questions

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4 Technology at its best

This eyeball camera is a marvel in its own making and shows Rob’s love for technology. This eye camera is similar to normal eye prosthesis which is embedded with a camera. It also comes equipped with radio frequency micro-transmitter.

However, this eyeball camera is not connected to optic nerve and Rob cannot see out of it. The view which Rob gets, comes on a handheld monitor and the camera can be turned on and off through tapping a magnet.

Rob points that whenever he puts the camera in the eye socket, the temperature of the eye increases and frequency of video transmission gets distorted and video signals become hard to be found.

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Rob does get one to three minutes shooting time whenever the eye camera is at work. If the same is used for any longer duration, it starts to overheat and Rob needs to get selective on occasions to use the same.

Rob has also put this eye ball camera to professional use though. It has been used to shoot other people’s bionic legs and arms. However this was for a noble documentary series on cybernetics and prostheses.

Technology at its best

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The Toronto based director is waiting for the day where the eye camera advances to a stage when it can be used to shoot sequences for hours together. This Rob thinks could be possible in the coming months as he is still fiddling with the technology.

He then envisages shooting projects that have emotional subjects through this lens. Whenever this might be possible it will be a great innovation for the film industry and people would wish to see this soon.

The technological instinct of Rob Spence has however turned an adversity into an opportunity and has made life easier and exciting for Rob who was suffering from a physical ailment for long.

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