This Family in Italy Feels No Pain and Scientists Have Finally Found Out The Reason Why

9Research on the Marsilis to formulate new pain relief treatment

Dr James Cox says that their nerves aren’t working as well as they should but researchers were trying their best to gain a better understanding of the reasons why they don’t feel pain and this will also help them formulate new pain relief medication and treatments. The research on the family was also published in the Journal Brain. The research in London took six years to identify the gene responsible for the condition.

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In the research, the scientists bred mice with the relevant mutation and found that the mice began displaying insensitivity to extremes in temperatures. Professor Aloisi, Letizia’s colleague said: “With more research to understand exactly how the mutation impacts pain sensitivity and to see what other genes might be involved, we could identify novel targets for drug development.”

Research on the Marsilis to formulate new pain relief treatment

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10In 2006, a family an entire family in Pakistan displayed a similar condition

While the Marsili Family has been regarded to be the only family in the world that is affected by this rare gene mutation, scientists in 2006 also discovered how an entire family in Pakistan possessed an abnormality where a mutation in genes responsible for regulating pain sensing neurons deactivated a component called Nav1.7 that warms the brain of pain or discomfort,. When removed, the brain can feel no pain.

On publication of research in the Journal Nature  on the family by Dr John Wood head of the sensory neurobiology group at University College London’s Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, pharmaceutical companies in excitement announced plans to formulate medication that block Nav1.7 but the efforts have not had success thus far.

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In 2006, a family an entire family in Pakistan displayed a similar condition

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11The bottom line: Pain is it good or bad?

Alxander Chesler a neurobiologist at the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland, says that “What’s so exciting is that this is a completely different class of pain insensitivity,“It tells you that this particular pathway is important in humans. And that’s what gets people in the industry excited. It suggests that there are changes that could be made to somebody to make them insensitive to chronic pain.”

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As for the Marsilis, call it good or bad, one thing is for sure, pain to some extent is necessary and one of the foremost warning beacons of our bodies to get treatment in time to prevent deterioration of any existing condition. Still complaining about pain??

The bottom line: Pain is it good or bad?

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