Science Finally Reveals Why Your Firstborn Is Smarter Than Their Siblings

Almost everyone you know is likely to have siblings. Maybe even you, the reader. Even you may be having siblings? This is one of the most common things for people. However, did you know that the order in which children are born actually makes a difference in their lives? 

Advertisement

A decade long study has found scientific proof that firstborns and second-borns have distinct differences. Read this article to find out what those differences are and how they come about. Is it all natural and genetic? Or do environmental factors like parental behaviour and attention and affection make a difference?

1A question for you

As a reader we want to ask you a simple question, do you have siblings? If your answer was yes, then are you the eldest? If you said yes twice then we have one last question for you. Do you feel like you’re wiser and are more rebellious than your siblings? Have you ever felt this way?

Advertisement
Image Source: ytimg.com

2The study at the University of Edinburgh

If you answered yes to all the questions above then we have some news for you. You might be right as we have scientific evidence and studies to back it up. For decades the feeling has been that the first child or the eldest of the siblings is the smarter one but now thanks to a study at the University of Edinburgh we have proof of that.

Image Source: independent.co.uk

3Birth does play a role

The study that was conducted at the University of Edinburgh wasn’t a small or short study but in fact, took over 14 years to complete. The reason for this was because siblings were used and their mental development was tracked from birth till their pre-teen to teen years.

Advertisement
Image Source: www.todaysparent.com

4How was this study conducted?

The research team got over 5,000 subjects with the majority being siblings to monitor since their birth until they reached the age of 14. The researchers also monitored the parents of the children to make sure how they were being brought up. The participants were ranked in categories of vocabulary assessment, reading, and matching letters.

Image Source: .theatlantic.com
Advertisement

You may also like...