Amazing!! Research now proves that King Tut had a Dagger made from Meteorites

There could be much more to the intelligence of the ancient Egyptians than what we give them credit for. The precision in which the pyramids were built, the meticulous planning and complex architecture still baffle scientists. Today, however, the latest Egyptian discovery is beyond belief and it is unimaginable as to how extraordinarily advanced this civilization was, in being ahead of their times. Even today, no race could possibly think of creating weapons from meteorites.

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This isn’t speculation, nor is it an assumption as scientific analysis has proved that the dagger possessed by King Tut found in his Tomb was made from meteorite stone. The revelation of King Tut’s dagger made from meteorites has caused quite a stir of excitement among the archaeological and scientific fraternity as it opens up new avenues for exploration and research on this amazing ancient civilization.

1 First Discovered By Howard Carter In 1922

The weapon that rested on the thigh of the boy king was first discovered by Howard Carter in 1922. Tutankhamen was a boy king who ruled Egypt in the 18th century. The son of Amenohotep the IV, he ascended the throne in 1322 BC. The historic discovery by Carter was significant because of the entire tomb was found intact with dozens of artifacts. In his journal, Carter described the dagger as an ornamental gold weapon topped with a crystal knob. The artifact is on display at the Cairo Museum.

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The study, published in the Journal of Meteoritics and Planetary Science holds fascinating insight into further possibilities of what the people of this ancient civilization were capable of.

King Tut

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2 Composition Bears Identical Resemblance to Meteoritic Material

King Tutankhamen’s dagger made from meteorites is made up of a homogenous rust proof metallic composition consisting of iron, cobalt and nickel existing in a ratio that is very similar to those found in meteorites whose primary metal is nickel.

It was the ratio of cobalt and nickel that closely resembled a meteoritic factor where the presence of 11% nickel was the determining element in concluding that it was made from meteorites. Scientists also stated that in those days, metallic weapons and artifacts was primarily made from iron with just a low percentage of nickel (4%) being present.

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King Tutankhamen’s dagger made from meteorites

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3 Egyptian Hieroglyphs Refer To “Iron from the Sky”

The dagger features a golden handle and gold sheath with a floral motif and feathery patterns on its sides. It is topped with a jackal’s head. The research wasn’t just conducted on the dagger alone. A trace of meteorite material was researched over an area in a 2000km radius where one particular material named Khargah yielded the same composition as the dagger. This was earlier discovered in 2000 at Mersa Matruh near Alexandria.

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It proves that the ancient Egyptians were aware of such rocks falling from the sky, to which they might have attributed a religious significance. Lending further credibility to the proof of King Tutankhamen’s Egyptian space dagger was the reference to a new hieroglyphic used by Egyptians in the 13th century, which when translated means “iron of the sky.”

Egyptian pyramids

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4 Not the Only Artifact Made From Meteorites, There’s More!

The fact that the boy King’s dagger was made from meteorites showed a great deal of sophistication in its production and is suggestive of the assumed fact that iron smithing was already an established practice in 14th century BC. But, if you thought this was just one isolated item unworthy of the hype and buzz, then think again.

The necklace found on the boy King bears an amulet scarab made of silica glass which is produced as a result of meteorite impact on sand. Such type of glass isn’t found anywhere except the most inhospitable areas of the Western Desert in Egypt. For the Egyptians to acquire such material on their own, they would have had to trek 500 miles which is virtually impossible.

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Artifact Made From Meteorites

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Among samples of the earliest Egyptian artifacts, dating back to 3200 BC are nine beads discovered in an excavated cemetery in the Nile Tombs of Gerzeh. The beads were also found to be manufactured from meteorite Iron.

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