Pink Was The Color of Boys Till the 19th Century But After WWI it Became a Girl’s Favorite

9Today the trend is more prominent than earlier times

If these color codes hold true as reflective of gender differences, then there is a possibility that they have some basis in human biology. A study in 2007 discovered evidence that males and females display some sensitivity to different regions of the color spectrum but the explanations are still speculative. Phillip Cohen says that in today’s world, children are differentiated by gender more than what was done 150 years ago when boy and girl babies both wore white dresses. Thus the increase of the color-gender difference may be more of a cultural concept.

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10Pink was the favorite color of a former first lady

Pink incidentally was the favorite color of first lady Mamie Eisenhower. She just loved it because it enhanced her pretty blue eyes. When she wore the rhinestone-covered pale pink gown to her husband’s 1950 inauguration, Mamie embodied the notion that “the men are home now, and you can return to your traditional roles.” In fact, she used pink so much that the White House became known as the “Pink Palace.’

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11Pink was regarded as less intimidating

In the fifties, many women found that they could use pink to their advantage. Being fond of pink and wearing pink clothes was easy to make a woman appear less intimidating without having to change their inherent personality. In the book “Pink Think” by Lynn Peril, she references a professional race car driver, Donna Mae Mims who competed in 1963 and called herself the Pink Lady.  Peril said that Ms. Mims may have had the audacity to compete against men and win, but pink helped to deflect criticism and reminded observers that she was, at heart, a girl like any other.”

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12It found its way into movies too

Consider one character in the Harry Potter franchise, Dolores Umbridge whose repeatedly wore fluffy pink suits to hide the fact that she was a psycho. And, consider the plucky and adorable lawyer Elle Woods and her al pink legally Blonde ensembles which is a more positive note.

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13The debate rages on

The debate of pink infused with feminity will no doubt rage on in various journals but then consider this bizarre statement that was found in a magazine in the early 20th century, which says   “the generally accepted rule is pink for the boy and blue for the girl.”

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