Mother makes heartbreaking decision to deliver a terminally ill baby so she could spend a few moments loving her

To deliver a still born baby can be devastating and traumatic for any mother but what would you say to the heartbreaking incident where mother delivered her terminally ill baby expected to live for just 15 hours which isn’t even a day. When a pregnant Abbey Ahern 34, was informed after a 19 week scan that her baby was suffering from a terminal illness called anencephaly, you can well understand how she must have felt.

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What would most parents do in such a situation, to be blunt, many would contemplate an abortion, but not Abbey. This courageous mother bred on the right principles, decided to deliver the baby even if it meant spending a few precious moments with her. She also decided to donate her organs.

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1 The most difficult decision

According to her, Abbey Ahern from Cashion, Oklahoma, delivering her terminally ill daughter is the most difficult thing she has ever done. When her baby girl was delivered, the family which included Abbey’s husband Robert 34 and two daughters Dylan and Harper aged 5 and 7 spent just 14 hours and 58 minutes of precious life with her. They named her Annie.

Said Abbey in an interview: “Carrying a terminally-ill baby to term was by far the most difficult thing I have ever done. “For us, even in the midst of our terrible heartbreak we were able to see so much beauty.

Abbey Ahern from Cashion, Oklahoma

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2 Anencephaly affects one in a 1000

According to the National Institutes of Health, 1 in every 1000 pregnancies is affected with the fatal anencephaly where the majority ends in miscarriage. Anencephaly is a condition where a baby’s brain and skull isn’t developed. It can be lethal during a pregnancy and even more fatal after birth. The condition can be diagnosed by an ultrasound during the gestation period of 12-14 weeks. The cause of this disease is still disputed. Abbey made the heart rending decision of delivering the child with support from her Husband Robert.

The hard decision of this mother who delivered her terminally ill baby was made despite a certain section of family and friends being skeptical about the whole thing. Abbey admitted that the shocking diagnosis sucked the life out of her, but she decided to go through the pregnancy even if it meant spending a few moments with Annie. The baby’s organs were later donated.

Mother with baby after giving birth

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3 A brief happy family moment

Before Annie was born, the couple underwent several meetings at the hospital to ensure that Annie’s organs were donated to Lifeshare, a service that arranges organ donor transplants. On the eventful day spent with Annie, they made her wear a white dress along with hat and Booties.

They didn’t know how long their baby girl would survive – but they knew her life would be short. Annie was born on 26th June, 2013. When Annie was put into her arms, Annie felt she couldn’t kiss her enough. For those 15 hours, it seemed the family was happy.

happy family moment

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4 Annie will always be a happy memory

Although the family shared a tender moment, they knew somehow that it was not going to last. Abbey knew that her baby would soon pass away and it was a short matter of time before that would happen. True enough the first heartbreaking sign came at 11pm.

Abbey heard a soft gasp from Annie. The life was slowly ebbing for the little girl. In Abbey’s own words She said: “If she had to die, I’m so glad it was in my arms.” Even though Abbey was devastated, after she delivered her terminally ill baby, she was also thankful that he’d little baby girl had experienced 15 hours of peace, joy and her mothers love. Abbey has since delivered another child Iva now 2 years old, but she wil never forget Annie and ensures her story is shared over and over again.

Annie will always be a happy memory

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