Shocking Discovery Finds 108 Abused Lions Living in Deplorable Conditions in Breeding Farm in South Africa

430 lions were kept in cages meant for two

The inspectors also saw that the cage conditions were filthy and overcrowded where the animals had no space to move. In cages that were meant for two people, almost 30 lions were stuffed in them. They also found three cubs who appeared suffering from meningoencephalitis, a neurological condition that inflames and infects the brain paralyzing its victim and making them unable to walk. One cub had to be euthanized by a vet at the facility.

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According to Wolhuter “It’s hard to describe because it leaves you feeling hollow, knowing that you’ve got the king of the jungle in conditions like that,” says Douglas Wolhuter, manager of the NSPCA wildlife protection unit that inspected the farm. “It’s soul-destroying.”

Image Source: dailymail.co.uk

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5Lions are kept in the worst unhygienic conditions

Subsequent reports on the captive lion industry has revealed information that the animals are in most cases kept in unhygienic and unsatisfactory conditions. The owner of Pienika farm is Jan Steinman who is supposed to be a member of the South African Predator Association or (SAPA). The organization supports captive breeding of lions and animals and declares hunting to be legal and ecologically responsible. SAPA members are required to maintain what they call are ethical standards. Steinman has been charged by the NSPCA for violation of the SA animals protection act 71 of 1962. If convicted then he could be fined about $2,700 or a year in jail.

Image Source: dailymail.co.uk

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6Activists say that animals are exploited from babies

Audrey Delsink who is the Wildlife Director of the Humane Society International, Africa said that the captive lion breeding industry in South Africa is vicious, and frequently indulges in exploitation of animals right from cradle to the grave. Delsink says that cubs are reared to be tuned into tourist attractions and once they are grown up lions and perceived as dangerous to interact with humans, they are then killed for their bones and exported to Asia to be made into traditional medicine or hunted and killed by trophy hunters who usually come from the USA seeking canned and manipulated hunts.

Image Source: www.nationalgeographic.com

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