Last Male Sumatran Rhino Dies in Malaysia Dealing a Huge Blow to Rhino Conservation

We are slowly witnessing one of the biggest tragedies related to the planet and what is worse is the fact that it is an ongoing one with no end or solution in sight. The extinction of animal species is saddening to say the least. Last year it was the last Northern African White Rhino Sudan who died in March 2018. Now it is the last male Sumatran Rhinoceros Tam who has died dealing a critical blow to conservation efforts of endangered species. Tam was the last of his kind.

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1The last Sumatran Rhino in captivity has died

Malaysia’s last male Sumatran Rhinoceros, has now died. The species was already near extinct and now with Tam’s death, the species fate has been finally sealed. The Sumatran Rhinoceros i8s the smallest of its species and is the cousin of the Javan Rhino. It was also the world’s most endangered rhino.

Image Source: malaymail.com

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2He was discovered in 2008

Tam was first discovered in an old oil plantation in 2008. He had been nosing around there and was noticed by wildlife officials who captured him and took him to the Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Sabah. The aim was to breed him with the two female rhinos Puntung and Iman who were also captured in 2011 and 2014 respectively. The mating though was not a success.

Image Source: mashable.com

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3Only one female of the species is left

Iman is now the sole member of her species in Malaysia since Puntung died in 2017. The biggest threat to the extinction of the Sumatran Rhinoceros is habitat loss and poaching where less than 80 were believed to have existed in the wild on the Island of Sumatra. Some also existed across Kalimantan in Borneo.

Image Source: www.thestar.com.my

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4Poaching is taking a heavy toll on endangered animals

In the last two decades, the population of Sumatran Rhinos has dropped drastically by almost 70% and all because of poaching. Less than 100 exist in Indonesia and isolated areas because the species is a very solitary one. They are also smaller in size in comparison to other Rhinos around the world and the females will give birth to one baby only once in three to five years.

Image Source: www.savingthesurvivors.org

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