The Incredible floating forest of Rotterdam has trees growing on water

What do you do when your city is below sea level? When entire neighborhoods are located almost 20 feet below sea level and you have much of your city covered in water, where is there room for landscaping or growing trees? Trees are an integral part of every city’s landscape as it helps a city to breathe. Greenery is important but when a city like Rotterdam in Netherlands is situated below sea level, how does one manage the greenery?

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This question was not an obstacle in the least for a group of artists from Rotterdam, who instead of growing trees on land would have them grown on water instead. Does the floating forest of Rotterdam sound ridiculous? Well read on to find out how they did it.

1 The Entire Project Was Modeled After A Sculpture In An Aquarium

In March this year, a unique project was undertaken by a group of artists who created what is now known as the Floating Forest of Rotterdam. Working under the banner of Mothership, an art production company, the project was inspired by a small art piece titled “The Sea of Habbitus” by artist Jorge Bakker. Mothership founder and leader of the project, Jerome Everaert commented that when he saw the initial sculpture he asked Artist Jorge Bakker if he could make a real one.

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A successful trial conducted in 2014 gave way to the real thing when the art project got underway in March. Titled “The Bobbing Forest”, it was created after the smaller model of miniature trees bobbing up and down in an aquarium. The trees were placed in small little fishing floats. The concept was integrated into the larger project.

The Entire Project Was Modeled After A Sculpture In An Aquarium

Image Source: www.twimg.com

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2 The Project Took Three Years of Research

The project took almost three years to develop where recycled sea buoys were used for planting the trees. Problems such as trees adapting to movement of the buoys were required to be sorted out to make the project feasible for permanent display. The artists used the help of University students to identify a tree called the Dutch Elm which was the most suitable candidate for the project as it was sturdy and could withstand being afloat. The Dutch Elm could also withstand the saltwater.

The project collected 20 young trees from different parts of the city to be planted on the buoys in the harbor. If successful it would pave the way for many such models in and around the city. Most of the artists felt that this was the only way to combat the greenery problem as Netherlands was virtually under the sea protected by dykes.

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The Project Took Three Years of Research

Image Source: www.fastcompany.net

3 The Bobbing Forest Will Last Up to 10 Years

The Bobbing Forest is made from recycled materials where trees were acquired from the Bomendepot, which is the public works department storage area for trees moved during city renovation.

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The opening day of the Bobbing Forest coincided with National Tree Day in the Netherlands. The young trees chosen for the project when fully grown will transform the harbor area into the floating forest which is expected to last up to 10 years. The floating forest of Rotterdam is the most unique way of bringing nature to the people of Netherlands.

The Bobbing Forest Will Last Upto 10 Years

Image Source: www.enterthemothership.com

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