How Coronavirus Actually Behaves Inside Your Body

Have you ever wondered what the coronavirus actually does to you once it takes hold of your body? Knowing what it does and what it can do to you, can really be useful in helping spread awareness to promote measures and practices that will help reduce the victims of this deadly virus.

Advertisement

Knowledge can be a good anxiety-reducing power. Ben Neuman, Ph.D. head of the biology department at Texas A&M University-Texarkana has worked with coronaviruses for 24 years. He simplifies the complex process of how your body fights against the coronavirus which causes COVID-19 and what happens when it can’t.

1Your body is always on high alert every day for any invaders

Neuman explained- “Every cell has to report to the immune system what it’s making at the time. There are special molecules that do this. They sort of grab a little sample of whatever we’re doing and hold it up and say to other systems in the body, ‘hey guys, what do you think about this?”

Advertisement

Image Source: www.medicaldevice-network.com

2Our body takes action when it locates invaders such as the coronavirus

Your immune system is called into action as soon as your body detects an invader so as to fight off the virus in a general way. This is a temporary measure until a more specific adaptive immune response kicks into gear. An amazing cascade consisting of the newly manufactured killer T cells form this second line of defense. As explained by Neuman- “They recognize, detect, and destroy. In people who survive infections with coronaviruses and do well, if you check their blood afterward, as we found with SARS, you find out that they have a really good killer T cell response. And the ones who don’t do well did not really make a killer T cell response.”

Advertisement

Image Source: zmescience.com

3Coronaviruses tend to remain undetected

The new coronavirus that is responsible for causing COVID-19, like all other viruses, makes as many replicas of itself as possible to avoid detection. While it may not be its intention to kill people, it still ends up doing that in some cases. It attaches itself to your cells in order to keep itself going. For this, it injects its RNA in there and reprograms the cell to turn into a virus for reproducing itself in the form of more viruses.

Advertisement

Image Source: ibtimes.sg

Advertisement

You may also like...