French Health Workers and Coronavirus Patients to Get Nicotine Patches After Research Finds Smokers Less Affected

Believe it or not but French researchers are planning to give COVID19 infected patients and frontline health workers nicotine patches to protect them from contracting the virus when they found that 4.4 % of350 virus patients hospitalized were smokers and 5.3% of 130 patients inbound at home also smoked. While not a signal to go and start smoking, it seems scientists have found some truth in the words of artist David Hockney who said that smoking could prevent coronavirus. Researchers and scientists in favor of this theory try to explain how this happens but it still does not advocate smoking as in the absence of the pandemic, smoking will do your body more harm than any good.

Advertisement

1Scientists find a beneficial effect of nicotine against the coronavirus

In France, researchers, in theory, assumed that nicotine could help prevent the virus from infecting human cells because of its ability to alter the immune system’s reaction and response to the virus. To test the theory, researchers are planning to do live trials by giving patients and health workers nicotine patches to check if it stimulated any effect on preventing the virus from spreading. An analytical report in the daily mail looked at various studies to deduct that there was bizarre evidence to prove that there could be some truth in the words of David Hockney a world-famous artist who said smoking could prevent coronavirus.

Health workers to get Nicotine patches

Image Source: insider.com

Advertisement

2Studies in China and the US found low rate of smokers among coronavirus patients

A study in China found that among coronavirus patients only just 6.5% were smokers. Another study by the CDC in the US found that among over 7000 hospitalized patients, only 1.3% were smokers in comparison to 14% of America. A study in Pitié Salpêtrière – part of the Hôpitaux de Paris used data from 480 patients who tested COVID19 positive. Among 350 were hospitalized and the rest were isolated at home. In that study, it was found that among a median age of 65, just 4.5% were smokers. Among those isolated at home with a median age of 44, just 5.3% were smokers.

Man with mask smoking  cigarette

Image Source: forbes.com

Advertisement

3Researchers say it is not a signal to start smoking

On a simpler note, research has found that fewer smokers are contracting the virus and even if they do, their symptoms are less serious. The study said “Our cross-sectional study strongly suggests that those who smoke every day are much less likely to develop asymptomatic or severe infection with Sars-CoV-2 compared with the general population, the effect is significant. It divides the risk by five for ambulatory patients and by four for those admitted to the hospital. We rarely see this in medicine.’ Research teams also explain that this is not a sign for people to start smoking because cigarettes have a greater health risk in the long term.

Study authors also say that in theory it was being regarded that nicotine could also prevent the immune system from reacting to the virus that could lead to severe complications in patients. The researchers will verify the results after giving health workers and ITU patients nicotine patches and studying the response to check if it is in line with their theories.

Advertisement
Female getting nicotine patch on arm

Image Source: www.thesun.co.uk

Advertisement

You may also like...