Ancient Mermaid Mummy Kept in Japanese Vault Finally Examined by Scientists and Results are Surprising

The mermaid was kept enshrined at the Enjuin Temple

Kinoshita said that when he found out that the mermaid mummy was kept at Enjuin, he called people from the university and the temple to do the investigation. Kinoshita persuaded the temple to let the scientists look at the strange remains. Takafumi Kato, a 54-years-old paleontology professor at the university, is overseeing the morphological examination of the Enjuin temple’s mummified mermaid specimen’s upper body. It will be his first time looking into this folkloric creature.

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Kato of the Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts and his team are trying to figure out where the mummy came from. On February 2, scientists used a CT scan to take a picture of the mummy. Researchers will also take samples of the mermaid’s DNA to figure out which species were mixed together to make it. They said the team would share their results at the end of the year.

The mermaid was kept enshrined at the Enjuin Temple

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The “mermaid” mummy in Japan is likely a mix of monkeys and fish

Unlike your common perception of a mermaid being half-human, half-fish, this Japanese mermaid is completely different. The 300-year-old mummy probably has the top half of a fish and the torso of a monkey sewn together.

The “mermaid” mummy in Japan is likely a mix of monkeys and fish

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It is said that the mummified specimen resembles two Japanese folkloric creatures

The mermaid mummy looks a little like Amabies, which are mermaids with beaks for mouths and three fins on their tails, and Ningyos, which are fish-like creatures with human heads. Both of these kinds of animals have been mentioned in stories about healing miracles and living longer. According to a folklore, a woman named Yao Bikuni is said to have lived for 800 years after she ate a whole Ningyo by accident.

It is said that the mummified specimen resembles two Japanese folkloric creatures

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Eujin temple’s priests revered the mermaid mummy as an omen of good health

The temple priests see the mummy as an omen of good health. According to the Japanese news site The Asahi Shimbun, Kozen Kuida, the head priest at the temple, stated, “We have worshipped it, hoping that it would help alleviate the coronavirus pandemic even if only slightly.”

Eujin temple’s priests revered the mermaid mummy as an omen of good health

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