Largest Study Ever Of 650,000 Children Says No Links between Autism and Vaccines

10Doctors are concerned with anti-vaccine propaganda online

Doctor Hviid feels that the study may not make much difference to the anti-vaccine brigade.”I do not think we can convince the so-called anti-vaxxers,” Hviid said. “I am more concerned about the perhaps larger group of parents who encounter anti-vaccine pseudoscience and propaganda on the internet, and become concerned and uncertain.”

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Doctors are concerned with anti-vaccine propaganda online
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11No link between autism and vaccines

Medical experts feel that the study is part of the ever-growing evidence that there is no link between autism and vaccines. Doctor Hviid has also advised parents not to give in to the fear of autism and skip important vaccines for their children. “The dangers of not vaccinating include a resurgence in measles which we are seeing signs of today in the form of outbreaks”, he said.

In the US from Jan-Feb 2019, six measles outbreaks were reported which infected 159 people as per statistics revealed by the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention). The largest was reported in Portland, Oregon that infected 68 people.

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No link between autism and vaccines
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12Teenagers are getting vaccinated without parental permission

In the USA there is now an alarming trend of the debate between autism and vaccines taking a new turn where teenagers who are more informed than the older generation getting their vaccines without parental knowledge. One such case is that of Ethan Lindenberger an 18-year-old who was not vaccinated. Ethan posted on Reddit asking for advice on getting vaccinated. His thread received 1,200 reponses. The Washington Post reported there were several teenagers some below 18 asking similar advice. Whether they can or cannot, depends on the laws governing the states they live in.

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13Anti-vaccine brigade asking questions

Dr. David Beyda, chair of the department of bioethics and medical humanism at the University of Arizona College of Medicine at Phoenix says “the anti-vaccination movement is powered by emotions and rhetoric, there are some anti-vaccinators who are now beginning to seek guidance of what to do with the measles outbreak. They are posting requests for guidance on how to protect their children from measles. “The response has been: ‘Get vaccinated.’”

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This article has been published for information only and does not seek to take an impartial side against either party. It is up to parents to base their decisions on well-researched and accurate information for the benefit of their children.

Image Source: newsweek.com
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