Beware of PMS… it can increase the risk of developing high blood pressure

PMS or premenstrual syndrome is a painful ordeal that most women go through every month before they get their periods. The headaches, nausea, and stomach cramps have proven to be more than just a monthly aggravation. PMS could be an indication of future health problems; so it’s advisable for women to be a little more careful about it. According to studies, PMS may increase the risk of developing high blood pressure.

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A new study has taken women by a storm that had researchers do a detailed study about the connection between PMS and high blood pressure and the chances of women experiencing PMS also getting diagnosed with high blood pressure. The researchers also found a way that could prevent the chances of developing high blood pressure.

1 Research

According to the researchers, the women who had PMS were 34 percent more likely to develop high blood pressure in the next 20 years than those who experienced few or no pre-menstrual symptoms.

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Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson, study author and an epidemiologist at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, said, “To my knowledge, this is the first large, long-term study to suggest that PMS may be related to risk of chronic health conditions in later life.”

During the course of the study, the researchers analysed the relationship between PMS and high blood pressure. The study was based on monitoring 1,250 women who showed clinically significant PMS between 1991 and 2005, and nearly 2,500 women who had few pre-menstrual symptoms.

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Research

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The women who participated in the study were aged between 25 and 45 years at the beginning of the study. The researchers followed up on them for 6-20 years. The women were questioned whether they were diagnosed with high blood pressure every two years subsequently.

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The results were shocking and the researchers found that women who were younger than 40 and had PMS, were more prone to high blood pressure compared to women of same age who didn’t have PMS. The women in this age group who had PMS were three times more likely to have high blood pressure. Alarming!

2 What is the connection?

The researchers weren’t able to pin point the exact mechanism that connects PMS and high blood pressure, but they penned down that it could be the underlying differences in the blood vessels of women who experienced PMS and those who didn’t.

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The study suggests that it is highly essential for women with PMS to be screened regularly for high blood pressure, especially women who are younger than 40.

 What is the connection?

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“We are seeing hypertension increase in women younger and younger,” quoted Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, Director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City. It is important that women pay attention to these bodily symptoms to understand what is happening to her and her whole body.

3 Vitamin B could be your way out

Luckily, women who have PMS don’t need to stress over developing high blood pressure so much that the worry becomes a cause for it. How ironic! Women with PMS who consumed high amounts of the vitamin B such as thiamine and riboflavin were less prone to high blood pressure later than the women with PMS who consumed low or zero amounts of the same.

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It is previously proven that women who consumed high amounts of Vitamin B were at 25 to 35 percent lower risk of developing PMS, compared to their counterparts who consumed less. Improving Vitamin B intake in women with PMS may reduce the severity of menstrual symptoms and keep hypertension risks at bay.

Vitamin B could be your way out

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