Most beautiful and bizarre modern art

There is no definition about pieces of art, everybody gets them in their own way, but sometimes artists can create bizarre and outrages art. No matter what way you would interpret these pieces of art, you will agree that they are a bit…well unusual.

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1 Photo realism

Beginning in the 1960s, the photo realist movement sought to create shockingly lifelike images, usually in imitation of actual photographs. By copying even the tiniest detail a camera could record, photo realist artists were able to produce “an image of an image of life.” The movement, also known as Super-realism or Hyper realism, encompassed sculpture as well as painting and was heavily influenced by the contemporary pop art movement. But while pop art ironically removed commercial images from their context, photo realism focused on the power of ordinary, everyday life, recreated as accurately as possible. The movement is usually not a hit with art critics, who often believe it elevates sheer mechanical proficiency over ideas and style.

Photo realism

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2 Body Fluid Art

It may sound disgusting and odd, but so many artists are creating works using bodily. Austrian performance artist Hermann Nitsch uses urine and copious amounts of animal blood in his work, producing extremely gory results. His performance pieces, influenced by his childhood during World War II, have caused controversy and even multiple court trials over the years. Another artist from Brazil, Vinicius Quesada is well-known for a series of body fluid paintings titled “Blood Piss Blues.” Quesada only works with his own blood, refusing donations or animal blood. Some of his notable individual works are Mr. Monkey, which features a cigar-smoking monkey with glasses made from a Nintendo game controller, and Temperateness, which shows a boy’s obsession with television.

Body Fluid Art

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3 Painting with body parts

Besides hands, there are some very talented artists that hold their brushes with their feet, mouth or maybe even elbows. But, this isn’t so unusual compared to the ones who use their body organs like it does Tim Patch, who goes by the name “Picasso” in homage to the great Spanish painter, Pablo Picasso. And also because he uses his genitalia as a paintbrush. There is another artist Kira Ayn Varszegi who uses her breasts to paint abstract portraits. Perhaps the strangest is Norwegian artist Morten Viskum, who reportedly paints with a severed hand.

Painting with body parts

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4 Body art illusion

As the name suggests, body art illusion involves painting a human skin to blend in with a background or otherwise deceive onlookers.The illusions range from people painted to look like animals or cars to more subtle, disturbing imagery, like gaping holes in their skin. Hikaru Cho is an acclaimed Japanese body artist known for her unusual, cartoon-like illusions. Other notable artists include Johannes Stoetter and Trina Merry, who has mastered the art of camouflaging her subjects.

Body art illusion

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5 Dirty car art

While most people would take their car to the car wash, some people see canvas in the dirt. The 52-year-old American graphic designer Scott Wade has become famous for his amazing drawings, created using the dirt found on car windows. Wade started out using the thick layers of dust from local Texas roads as his canvas, and originally sketched cartoons using his fingers, fingernails, and twigs.

Dirty car art

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6 Reverse 3-D Imaging

The reverse 3-D imaging tries to do the opposite, it makes a three-dimensional object look like a drawing or painting. Alexa Meade is an artist based in Los Angeles, where she uses non-toxic acrylic paint to make her subjects look like inanimate, 2-D paintings. She began developing the technique in 2008, although she only unveiled it publicly in late 2009. Meade’s works generally involve a human subject sitting against a painted wall to give the appearance of a canvas, and can take several hours to complete. Another popular figure in the field is the Cynthia Greig, a Detroit-based artist and photographer. Greig uses ordinary household items as her subjects, coating them with white paint and charcoal to create an illusion of flatness.

Reverse 3-D Imaging

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