Top 7 Most Famous Authors of All Time

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To read is to travel to strangest places, meet amazing and thrilling characters and get lost for a while. Reading can help you learn new things; can help you realize that you are not alone and for sure can make you feel like you know the author personally. Some of the authors who wrote those classics we are still reading today, have dedicated their entire lives on writing and hoping that they would get published. Not all of them were popular like they are today, nor rich or published as they hoped to be. The following list will present you the names of some of the most famous Authors of all time.

#1. William Shakespeare

Of course he took the first place on this list. The author of some of the timeless titles like “Romeo and Juliet”, “Othello”, “Lady Macbeth” is still a favorite read to many people even after 5 centuries after his death. His words are still very much alive and still true in most segments of life. Some people lately are spreading odd theories like those that he never actually existed, or that a member of the royal family wrote everything under the pseudonym of Shakespeare. However, his plays are as good as new.

William Shakespeare
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#2. George Orwell (His real name was Eric Arthur Blair)

This author isn’t everyone’s favorite, especially to those who do not share his views on totalitarianism. But “Animal Farm” and “1984” are novels that truly get the reader to think more about politics, society and culture. Political Science students should definitely read these two books, and not only them, since the two books contain some great allegory of the way the “democratic” world functions.

George Orwell (His real name was Eric Arthur Blair)
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#3. J.K Rowling

Nine publishers rejected her master piece about the child wizard, Harry Potter. But the tenth publisher gave her a chance and the rest is a history. You don’t have to like her but Ms. Rowling has a style of writing that has launched her into the annals of literary history. Her Harry Potter books have won awards not only for their imagination but also for their strong prose. She gave life to some of the world’s beloved characters and made children love reading. Not to mention the adapted movies, those too were made really well.

J.K Rowling
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#4. Virginia Woolf

This writer had a unique passion for the written word and enjoyed literary success and accolades for her many works, including “To the Lighthouse”, “Mrs. Dalloway” and “A Room of One’s Own.” People like to say that Ms. Woolf as a “feminist” before the invention of the word; certainly, her popularity among women and academicians seemed to grow in direct correlation to the feminist movement of the late 1960s. If you haven’t read anything from this writer, you really must.

Virginia Woolf
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#5. Ernest Hemingway

Hemingway dealt with depression, as many writers during his life time. If nothing else, it helped him to write some of the greatest novels of all time. He hass been called somewhat of an acquired taste, if you’re just beginning your Hemingway adventure, start with the legendary “The Sun Also Rises” or “A Farewell to Arms”. Of course don’t skip “The Old Man and the Sea”.

Ernest Hemingway
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#6. Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde was an Irish writer and poet. His full name was Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde. In the early 1890s, he became the most famous playwrights in London. Some of his most famous books are “The Picture of Dorian Gray”. It was rumored that he had preferences towards men, but that was never proven. He died in Paris and was buried on the famous graveyard Pere Lachaise where his tomb is among the most visited.

Oscar Wilde
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#7. J.D Salinger

Salinger was raised in Manhattan and began writing short stories while in secondary school. Several were published in the early 1940s before he began serving in World War II. “The Catcher in the Rye” is one of those novels that you won’t be able to forget once you read it. Salinger manages to capture the essence of an era and weave it into a story that has stood the test of time. For the time it was written, it was a bit racy but this book is also one of those timeless classics that you ought to read it.

J.D Salinger
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