Declawing your cat is a bad Idea – Here’s why

If you own a cat you probably have one or two scratched pieces of furniture or walls, and perhaps you’ve been thinking to take your feline friend get declawed. Even though some vets recommend this if your cat stays exclusively inside, do not take this advice and do not even think about doing this to your cat. To have it described more realistically; it is as if someone rip off the tips of your fingers. Here are the reasons why you should not declaw your cat by any means.

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1 Declawing will not benefit your cat

Usually the main reason is all the scratching your cat does at your home. Yes, it is annoying and it truly damages expensive pieces of furniture, but if you hate this, don’t have cat at all. Declawing does not benefit the cat, both health wise and behavior wise, declawing simply does nothing positive for the cat.

Declawing will not benefit your cat

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2 Declawing literally leaves your cat without its main weapon

A typical argument is that the cat stays inside. Even indoor cats sometimes manage to escape and the outside world is dangerous and hard for a declawed cat. Without its claws, the cat does not stand a chance against a large dog, a bigger cat, or a predator. Although, he still has teeth, by the time he gets in close enough to bite, it may be too late.

Declawing literally leaves your cat without its main weapon

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3 Declawing is a painful surgery

Think of it as 10 amputations (usually only the front claws are declawed). Pain meds may help initially, but phantom pain may last for weeks or months, as nerve endings heal. It literally means that the root of the claw is ripped off, so, there won’t be a chance for it to grow again. Do you really hate your cat that much?

Declawing is a painful surgery

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4 Declawing may lead to litter box problems

Declawed cats often associate the pain when digging in litter with the litter box itself, and will avoid doing it, choosing softer surface such as carpets or the floor (so you have solved one problems with scratched furniture but you just cause another, much more disgusting one). Without claws, even house-trained cats may urinate and defecate outside the litter box in an attempt to mark their territory. Declawed cats may be morose, reclusive, and withdrawn or irritable, aggressive, and unpredictable. Many people think that declawed cats are safer around babies, but in fact, the lack of claws, a cat’s first line of defense, makes many cats feel so insecure that they tend to bite more often as a means of self-protection.

Declawing may lead to litter box problems

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5 Declawing often leads to biting problems

When cats lose their ability to give a quick warning scratch, they will often resort to their second line of defense – they will bite. The cat’s owner are often the victims (you already know that cats do bite even when you pet them, it’s how they play and associate).

Declawing often leads to biting problems

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6 Cats need to exercise with their claws

Watch your cat when it stretches, whether horizontally on a carpet or vertically with a tall scratching post they will grab the carpet or sisal with his claws, using the resistance to pull and stretch his muscles. Cat’s claws actually play a large and positive role in their amazing muscle toning and agility.

Cats need to exercise their claws and toes provide

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7 Declawing is not regular nail trimming

Nor is declawing only the removal of a portion of a claw. Instead, it is the surgical amputation of the first joint of the cat’s toes. The procedure is usually accomplished with a scalpel, a guillotine-type cutter or a laser. It is still a surgery, and not to be undertaken lightly. It is super painful after the cat wakes up.

Declawing is not a regular nail trimming

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8 There is no health benefit to the cat and serious complications can occur

Unlike neutering or other health surgeries that have long health and behavioral effects, declawing does not have any effect on your cat. In fact, many declawed cats suffer from health problems as a result of the amputation. Complications that may result from the surgery include hemorrhaging, abscesses, bone chips that prevent healing (if the declaw surgery was not performed correctly), and regrowth of a deformed claw. In the long term, as shoulder, leg, and back muscles weaken due to a shift in balance and weight, your cat may develop chronic conditions such as arthritis or back and joint pain.

There is no health benefit to the cat and serious complications can occur

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